Mr. Rogers' Honors Physics

Syllabus 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter
Fundamentals(1)
1D Motion(2)
Accel Motion(3)
1D Force(3)
 

Accelerated Motion-- Chapter 3
SC Standards :

Indicators

P-2.1 Represent vector quantities (including displacement, velocity, acceleration, and force) and use vector addition.
P-2.2 Apply formulas for velocity or speed and acceleration to one and two-dimensional problems.
P-2.3 Interpret the velocity or speed and acceleration of one and two-dimensional motion on distance-time, velocity-time or speed-time, and acceleration-time graphs.
P-2.4 Interpret the resulting motion of objects by applying Newton’s three laws of motion: inertia; the relationship among net force, mass, and acceleration (using F = ma); and action and reaction forces.
P-2.5 Explain the factors that influence the dynamics of falling objects and projectiles.
P-2.6 Apply formulas for velocity and acceleration to solve problems related to projectile motion. P-2.7 Use a free-body diagram to determine the net force and component forces acting upon an object


   

Practice Test Study Guide

Objectives

Essential Question: How can we evaluate how fast an object is changing its speed?

Acceleration

  1. Define average acceleration. A change in velocity over a time increment

  2. Solve problems using average acceleration.
  • Bob hits a tree
  • bouncing ball
  1. State the meaning of the sign on acceleration. Direction

  2. By looking at the directions of the velocity and acceleration vectors, determine if an object is speeding up or slowing down.

  • same direction = speeding up
  • opposite direction = slowing down
  1. Define instantaneous acceleration. The time increment approaches zero.

  2. Determine both average and instantaneous accelerations from plots of velocity vs. time graphs. acceleration = slope of the velocity vs. time graph

Homefun (formative/summative assessment): Read sections 3.1, do Practice Problems 6 to 11 on page 64

 

Formative Assessment: Physics Investigation

Title Reaction Time Measurement
Research Question What is the reaction time for catching a dropped object?
Background Human reaction time is a key factor in many situations such as the distance a car travels in order to stop. However, reaction time can be difficult to measure since it is relatively small.
Hypothesis Reaction time can be measured by measuring the distance a dropped object falls and then calculating time.
Data, Calculations Calculate the reaction time for each individual in the class and make comparisons.
Conclusions  

Follow up Questions

 
Deliverables  
Resources/Materials  

 

 

Essential Question: How can we visualize the relationship between acceleration and velocity?

Velocity with Constant Acceleration

  1. Given constant acceleration, draw the acceleration vs time plot (a vs. t plot).

  2. Given constant acceleration, draw the velocity vs time plot (v vs. t plot).

    • the slope of the v vs. t cure at an instant = acceleration at the same instant
    • acceleration can only be used to find changes in velocity it cannot determine the starting velocity.
    • area under the a vs. t curve for a particular time interval = change in velocity for the time interval.
  1. Derive a velocity vs. time equation using the fact that the change in velocity over a time interval = the area under the curve for the acceleration vs time plot. Hint: what is the area of a rectangle?

  2. Solve velocity problems given constant acceleration.

     

Homefun (formative/summative assessment): Read sections 3.2, do Practice Problems 18 to 21 on page 65

 

 
Essential Question: How are quantities like distance and displacement, speed and velocity similar yet different?

Displacement (Position) with Constant Accelerations

  1. Given constant acceleration, draw the displacement (position) vs time plot (v vs. t plot).
    • the slope of the displacement vs. t cure at an instant = velocity at the same instant
    • velocity can only be used to find changes in displacement it cannot determine the starting displacement.
    • area under the v vs. t curve for a particular time interval = change in displacement for the time interval.
  2. Derive a displacement vs. time equation using the fact that the change in displacement (position) over a time interval = the area under the curve for the velocity vs time plot. Hint: what is the area of a triangle and a rectangle?

    a = constant

    v = a*t + vo

    x = 1/2*a* t^2 + vo*t + xo

Homefun (formative/summative assessment): problems 30 to 33, page 71

 

Essential Question: What does a free falling object look like?

Free Fall and Other Forms of Constant Acceleration

  1. Define a free falling object. Only the force of gravity is acting on the object. We ignore air resistance.

  2. Graph x vs. t, v vs t, and a vs t curves for a free falling object under different conditions (defining downward as negative).
    • a vs. t : always a negative straight horizontal line
    • v vs. t : always a straight line with a downward slope = acceleration
    • x vs. t ; always a section of a parabola that's concaved-downward
  3. Graph x vs. t, v vs t, and a vs t curves for any object with constant positive acceleration. It's the same as a falling object except:
    • a vs. t : always a positive straight horizontal line
    • v vs. t : always a straight line with an upward slope = acceleration
    • x vs. t ; always a section of a parabola that's concaved-upward
  1. Solve problems with constant acceleration using the kinematic equations.
    • dropped object
    • object thrown upward
    • object thrown downward
    • slamming on the breaks
    • stepping on the gas

Homefun (formative/summative assessment): problems 43 to 45, page 74

 

Essential Question: How can you best prepare for the test?

Review of Objectives 1- 13 (1-3 days)

Formative Assessments:

  1. Work review problems at the board

  2. Work practice problems.

Metacognition Problem Solving Question: Can I still work the problems done in class, several hours or days later? Some amount of repetition on the exact same problems is necessary to lock in learning. It is often better to thoroughly understand a single example of a problem type than to work example after example understanding none of them completely.

Relevance: Good test preparation is essential to performance in physics class.

Homefun (formative/summative assessment): problems 47and 49, page 75; problems 75, 81, 91, 99, 111 turn in on the day stapled to the back of the test.

Summative Assessment: Unit exam objectives 1-16

 
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