Mr. Rogers' AP Physics C: Mechanics (With IB Physics Topics) Objectives

Syllabus 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter
Gravity   Circular Motion Statics Rotation  

Chapter: Statics

AP Physics C Newtonian Mechanics:
E. Circular motion and rotation (continued) 1% (estimated), cumulative 89%
2. Torque and rotational statics 

 

Practice Test Study Guide

Objectives

Essential Question: What do civil engineers do? Why did the Twin Towers collapse? (Remember this one?)

Statics (the second half of the story)

Section 12.1, 12.3

  1. Define torque 2 ways:

  • t F x r
  • A twisting action

 

  1. Explain the difference between a vector dot product and cross product.

Note: the torque (t = F x r) and work (w = Fr) equations look like they'd yield the the result same but one is a cross product and a vector. The other is a dot product and a scalar

 

  1. State all of the requirement for a static condition to exist.

SFx = 0, SFy = 0, SFz = 0

Stxy =  0, Styz =  0,  Stzx =  0

Note: We will typically work in only 2 dimensions (x, y) for forces and in only one plane (xy) for torque

 

 

Homefun: Problems 13, 15, 23, 57, 55. Serway

Metacognition Problem Solving Principle 6.1: When solving statics problems using torque equations the pivot point can be placed anywhere. Often the problem can be greatly simplified by placing it in a convenient location.

 

Activities

Lesson 1

Key Concept: Static equilibrium

Purpose: Define and understand the conditions required for static equilibrium.

Interactive Discussion: Objectives

In Class Problem Solving:  

  1. Toto atop the storm cellar door
  2. Luke Skywalker walks the plank.
  3. Ed the restaurateur hangs his sign.
  4. Bob's big bicept
  5. Calculate mechanical advantage (what they didn't tell you in physical science class)

 

Mini-Lab Physics Investigation (Requires only Purpose, data, and conclusion)
Title Finding Center of Mass
Purpose Find the center of mass of an odd shaped flat object
Overview
  1. Hang an odd shaped flat object from a point on its edge so that it is free to pivot. hang a plumb line from the same point and draw the line on the flat object.
  2. Repeat the above process from at least 3 different points.

If done correctly, each of the plumb lines will pass through the center of mass. Where they intersect represents the center of mass.

Data, Calculations
  1. Calculate the position (x, y coordinates) of the center of mass of the odd shaped object
  2. Calculate a % difference between the measured and theoretical center of mass coordinates.
Questions, Conclusions
  1. Estimate your experimental error in measuring the center of mass.
Resources/Materials: Flat odd shaped objects, meter sticks, plumblines
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Insultingly Stupid Movie Physics is one of the most humorous, entertaining, and readable physics books available, yet is filled with all kinds of useful content and clear explanations for high school, 1st semester college physics students, and film buffs.

It explains all 3 of Newton's laws, the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics, momentum, energy, gravity, circular motion and a host of other topics all through the lens of Hollywood movies using Star Trek and numerous other films.

If you want to learn how to think physics and have a lot of fun in the process, this is the book for you!

 

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now the book!


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